10 Best Grapeseed Oil Substitutes That You Can Try

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Deep-fried food is liked by most of us. But for deep frying or any sort of high-heat cooking, you always need to remember to use the correct type of oil. Well, for that, grapeseed oil is definitely one of the best options. So, let me tell you about the best grapeseed oil substitutes. 

Grapeseed Oil

Grapeseed oil is a staple in many kitchens, thanks to its neutral flavor and high smoking point. However, there can be times when you run out of the same. You can easily work your way around a situation like this, though, by using a grapeseed oil substitute!

Now at this point, I think you may be wondering what can actually work in place of grapeseed oil. The best substitutes for grapeseed oil are canola oil, avocado oil, corn oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, almond oil, walnut oil, and sesame oil. 

However, I do believe that before I tell you more about the substitutes, I should tell you a little bit about grapeseed oil itself. Knowing more about the ingredient itself will make it much easier for you to pick your substitute. So, let us discover what grapeseed oil is!

Quick Peek: Grapeseed Oil

This section has all the basic information about grapeseed oil. You will get to know all about the oil and its origin, the flavor and texture of the oil, where it is used, and also some nutritional information and health benefits about the same. 

What Is Grapeseed Oil?

Grapeseed oil, a by-product of the wine-making industry, is a vegetable oil derived from grape seeds. The production of this oil mainly occurs in wine-making regions, especially around the Mediterranean sea. 

The seeds of grapes are pressed for the production of this oil. This oil has various culinary uses along with a lot of health benefits. It is a popular oil added to many beauty products because of the natural benefits it has. 

Describing Grapeseed Oil: Flavor And Texture

Grapeseed oil has a liquid consistency, quite similar to that of any other type of oil. The texture is thin and silky, with a light yellowish-green color. Grapeseed oil also does not solidify at room temperature like various other types of oils do. 

When we talk about the flavor of grapeseed oil, it is overall fairly neutral. It does not really have any floral or nutty flavors as various other oils do. Although made from grape seeds, grapeseed oil does not really carry that flavor either. 

Uses Of Grapeseed Oil

As it has a pretty high smoking point, grapeseed oil is one of the preferred oils for deep frying or any form of high-temperature cooking. Grapeseed oil also does not go rancid for a very long time, which also makes it a good oil for high-temperature cooking. 

Other than that, the grape seed oil is also great for stir-frying and sauteing. Moreover, you can sear various types of meats and vegetables in grapeseed oil.

It can be used for grilling and also added to salad dressings. As it has a neutral flavor, it will not impact the overall flavor of your food. 

Grapeseed Oil On The Health Radar | Looking Through The Wellness Telescope

Grapeseed oil is a type of oil that’s definitely high in calories and is, of course, never eaten as it is. However, grapeseed oil contains absolutely no amount of cholesterol, and it has been linked to quite a lot of health benefits. 

A tablespoon or around 15 grams of grapeseed oil has 120 calories, out of which almost all calories are from fat. But, other than that, grapeseed oil is a very good source of vitamin E. It contains more vitamin E than various other types of oils. 

Grapeseed oil is also rich in omega-6 fatty acids. Some of the potential health benefits linked to grapeseed oil are improving inflammation and, reducing insulin resistance, reducing the risk of heart disease, as it is rich in antioxidants. 

Why Use A Substitute For Grapeseed Oil?

Grapeseed oil is linked to some health benefits and also is also generally a great oil to cook with. So, some of you must have wondered why you would want to use a substitute for the same. Well, that is an extremely valid point, for sure. 

However, there actually are a few reasons why you can and may consider using a substitute for grapeseed oil. For starters, grapeseed oil is not as popularly available as various other types of oils listed in the substitute section. 

So, if you are having trouble with finding grapeseed oil in stores near you, you can easily use a substitute for the same that has a similar neutral flavor and a high smoking point. Other than that, grapeseed oil can sometimes be a little pricey. 

So, if you want a substitute that is more budget-friendly, you can look through all the options given in the substitute section and choose the one that works best for your recipe. Lastly, if you simply are out of it, there is no need to run to the store! 

You can easily use a substitute for the same that might already be present in your pantry, making it much easier for you. I think these are reasons good enough to consider using a substitute for grapeseed oil. 

I think that is enough information about grapeseed oil for you. So, before your brain gets saturated with more information about grapeseed oil, let me help you with all the best substitutes you can use in place of grapeseed oil. 

10 Best Grapeseed Oil Substitutes

This section has all the best substitutes you can use in place of grapeseed oil. Moreover, you will get to know the health benefits of each substitute, what recipes the substitutes will work best in, and also the ratio of substitution. 

1. Canola Oil

Extracted from rapeseeds and also known by the name ‘rapeseed oil,’ canola oil is a kitchen staple for many. It has a neutral flavor and a similar smoking point to that of grapeseed oil, making it a good substitute for the same. 

As canola oil has a neutral flavor, it will not overpower the overall flavor of your food, just like grapeseed oil. It can be infused with various other ingredients and hence can easily be used in any recipe without worrying about the flavor. 

Canola oil is moreover rich in vitamin E and omega-6 fatty acids, just like grapeseed oil is. Maybe not the best option for deep frying, but canola oil works well for sauteing, shallow frying, and even roasting. Use it as a substitute in a 1:1 ratio. 

2. Avocado Oil

Avocado oil is extracted from the pulp of avocado. This oil has a mild flavor and a similarly high smoking point, just like that of grapeseed oil. It can work as a substitute for grapeseed oil in various ways. 

Considering the high smoking point of avocado oil, it does not go rancid too quickly. So, that is definitely a big plus for avocado oil. Moreover, it is rich in vitamin E and has healthy fats that help reduce cholesterol levels. 

Avocado oil works really well for deep frying because of its high smoking point. It also can work well for sauteing and roasting, along with shallow frying. However, the downside is that it is expensive, just like grapeseed oil. 

3. Safflower Oil

Extracted from crushed safflower seeds, safflower oil has a high smoking point similar to that of grapeseed oil. Moreover, it is neutral in flavor and hence works well as a substitute for grapeseed oil. 

Due to its high smoking point, safflower oil is a great option for deep frying. It can also be used for sauteing or roasting and as a drizzle over salads or other recipes. It does have a neutral flavor too, so it will not overpower the flavor of your dish. 

Also, because of its neutral flavor, safflower oil makes a great option for baking too. However, it is worth noting that safflower oil can be expensive in certain places. Although, you can use it in any recipe as a substitute in a 1:1 ratio. 

4. Peanut Oil

Peanut Oil

Peanut oil is extracted from peanuts, also known as groundnuts. This oil has a very high smoking point and is almost everyone’s ideal choice for deep frying. That makes it a great substitute for grapeseed oil. 

Peanut oil can be used for more than just deep-frying. It works well in sauteing and roasting and especially with Asian food. This oil, however, does not have a neutral flavor as grapeseed oil does. 

Peanut oil has a distinct flavor of peanuts that will definitely overpower your dish if used in a very high quantity. So, only use it if you are okay with the flavor in your food. Moreover, be careful of peanut oil if you have nut allergies. 

5. Sunflower Oil

Sunflower oil is extracted from the seeds of sunflowers. Very common in many kitchens, this oil has a high smoking point and a neutral taste. That makes it a good substitute for grapeseed oil. 

Sunflower oil will remain neutral in any food and will not impart a strong flavor. It is a great option for deep frying due to its high smoking point. Other than that, it is also great for roasting, sauteing, and grilling. 

Sunflower oil is also a very affordable option. It is rich in vitamin E, just like grapeseed oil. But, make sure not to use sunflower oil too many times as it can turn rancid quickly. You can use it as a substitute for grapeseed oil in a 1:1 ratio. 

6. Almond Oil

Almond oil is extracted from almonds. It has a high smoking point with a nutty and mild taste. Due to its high smoking point, it can be used as a substitute for grapeseed oil in various recipes. 

Almond oil is rich in healthy fats and antioxidants and is a great source of vitamin E, just like grapeseed oil. In case you want an oil with an added flavor to it, the nutty flavor of almond oil will complement any recipe perfectly. 

However, almond oil does have a downside, and that is the fact that almond oil is really expensive. So, it might work best in recipes where you would not require too much of it. Moreover, almond oil should be avoided by people with certain nut allergies. 

7. Walnut Oil

Extracted from walnuts, walnut oil has a nutty flavor. Though it does not have as high a smoking point as grapeseed oil does, walnut oil can work as a substitute for grapeseed oil in certain recipes. 

Walnut oil is a good option to drizzle over salads or in dips. It can also be used for sauteing, grilling, roasting, and baking. Walnut oil is, however, another very expensive oil. So, it might not be the best choice for bulk cooking. 

Walnut oil, however, is very rich in vitamins, minerals, and also healthy fats. It has a lot of health benefits linked to it too. So, from a nutritional standpoint too, walnut oil is a great option for substituting grapeseed oil. 

8. Sesame Oil

Sesame oil is extracted from sesame seeds. Though it has an intense flavor as compared to grapeseed oil, it also does have a high smoking point like grapeseed oil. So, it can work as a substitute for the same in certain recipes. 

Sesame oil comes in dark and light varieties. Light sesame oil is made with plain sesame seeds and has a milder flavor, whereas dark sesame oil is made with roasted sesame seeds and has an intense flavor. 

As a substitute for grapeseed oil, light sesame oil would work better as the flavor of dark sesame oil might get too overpowering. Light sesame oil is also a good option for deep frying. Moreover, it is rich in nutrients and in antioxidants. 

9. Corn Oil

Corn oil is extracted from the germ of the corn plant. It has a high smoking point with a neutral taste. This makes it a great substitute for grapeseed oil in various recipes. 

Corn oil is again a healthy option with various health benefits attached to it. Moreover, a version of corn oil, which is organic pressed corn oil, is one of the healthiest oils available in the market and helps manage cholesterol levels. 

Corn oil is, moreover, cheap and great for deep frying due to its high smoking point. Also, being budget-friendly, you can easily use corn oil in place of grapeseed oil for bulk cooking, all in a 1:1 ratio of substitution. 

10. Olive Oil

Olive oil is extracted by grinding olives and separating the oil from them. This oil has a neutral flavor and not a very high, but still manageably high, smoking point. So, olive oil can be used as a substitute for grapeseed oil in certain recipes. 

Olive oil is rich in vitamin E, omega-three fatty acids, and monounsaturated fat, which helps with overall heart health. Moreover, olive oil also comes in the extra virgin form, which is even better for health. 

Olive oil is not the perfect option for deep frying. However, olive oil is great for shallow frying and sauteing and can also be used in baking. Moreover, it will not overpower your dish because of its neutral flavor. 

Short Recap For Best Grapeseed Oil Substitutes

This article was definitely extensive, considering the number of substitutes and the description of all of them. But, I would still like to break it down further for you to make it easier for you to pick your substitute. For that, just have a look below!

The Best Substitute For Grapeseed Oil In Terms Of Flavor:

Canola oil works well in terms of having a similar flavor if you use it as a substitute for grapeseed oil.

The Best Substitute In Terms Of Smoking Point:

Peanut oil is a perfect substitute for grapeseed oil in terms of smoking point.

Budget-Friendly Substitutes:

  1. Sunflower oil, 
  2. Corn oil 
  3. Canola oil 

Substitutes To Be Considered Last:

  1. Almond oil 
  2. Walnut oil 

Final Word

Now that we have come to the end of this article, I really hope it has helped you find the perfect substitute for grapeseed oil in your recipe. Grapeseed oil is definitely a healthy oil with a lot of health benefits attached to it. 

Although popular in many places, grapeseed oil can sometimes be an expensive option for many. But, having said that, quite a lot of the substitute options given are very budget-friendly and are the perfect fit if you are looking for something less expensive. 

Other than that, most of the substitute options given above have health benefits that are very similar to that of grapeseed oil. So, that will make picking your substitute a little easier. I hope you have fun in the kitchen with whichever substitute you pick and I will see you next time!

How To Substitute Grapeseed Oil

Grapeseed Oil

Grapeseed Oil Substitutes

Grapeseed oil is a great oil that works for various purposes. However, sometimes grapeseed oil can be difficult to find. In that case, you can use any of the substitutes given in this article.
5 from 1 vote

Ingredients
  

  • Canola Oil
  • Avocado Oil
  • Safflower Oil
  • Peanut Oil
  • Sunflower Oil
  • Almond Oil
  • Walnut Oil
  • Sesame Oil
  • Corn Oil
  • Olive Oil

Instructions
 

  • Go through the substitutes and see which one seems fit for the recipe.
  • Collect your ingredients and use your preferred substitute.
  • Use the substitute in the required amount and proceed to make the dish according to the recipe.
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

What is grapeseed oil good for?

Grapeseed oil is great for deep frying, sauteing, grilling, and roasting. 

Is grapeseed oil healthy?

Grapeseed oil has a good amount of healthy fats and vitamin E in it, making it a healthy oil.

Is grapeseed oil healthier than olive oil?

Both these types of oils are rich and equally healthy. 

Can you use grapeseed oil for skin care?

Yes, grapeseed oil is excellent for skin care.

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